Summer Hours....................Central administration offices are open from 7:30am to 5:00pm, Monday through Thursday during the summer.
Homework
Restate the question and use complete sentences in each answer.
If you were not in class when we listened to versions of Pandora's Box,  listen to this version of Pandora's box. Then compare it to the one in the book. The pdf of the one in the book is further below in the old assignments, dated April 5, if you can't access Classzone to read it.
This assignment is for the Narrative: Reading: Differences in related text checkmark.

Pandora's Box.mp4
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Assigned Aug. 21, due Aug. 22
Read "The Elevator" on pages 27-31 of the new literature book. When you have finished reading, write at least a page continuing the story and telling what happens next. (If you cannot access the book online for some reason, click on: http://crushwriter.freeforums.org/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=46&start=0&&view=print&sid=e0658dd63efa5efe927189a40a13e71a
to read the story, or click here.

Assigned Aug. 22, due Aug. 23
Read "The Lady or the Tiger?" on pages 684-691 of the new literature book, or click on this pdf: The Lady or the Tiger?.pdf 
The assignment is: What came out of the door, the lady or the tiger? Write at least a page of a new ending showing what came out the door.

Assigned Aug. 23, due Aug. 26
Write a 20-page outline of an original short story with a twist. You will write the short story as this nine weeks' big project.

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Assigned Aug. 15, due Aug. 19
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "Rules of the Game" on pages 349-358 of the old literature book. Read "From Searching for Bobby Fischer" on page 359. On page 360, answer questions 1 plus the comprehension check questions, No. 2, and write a 100-word Better Answer to No. 5. Extra credit: In at least half a page, describe a moment in your life that was similar to what Josh Waitzkin went through in "From Searching for Bobby Fischer."

1. What kind of daughter is Waverly? Use details from the story to support your answer.
CC1. How does Waverly acquire a chess set?
CC2. Why does Waverly's mother create a special set of family rules for Waverly?
CC3. What does Waverly do at the end of the story?
2. This story is about more than the rules of a chess game. It is about the rules of life. What rules of life does Waverly learn in the story?
5. 100-word Better Answer: One reviewer of Amy Tan's work wrote, "Amy Tan examines the sometimes painful, often tender, and always deep connection between mothers and daughters." In "Rules of the Game," does Tan portray the relationship between mothers and daughters as both painful and tender? Support your answer with examples and details from the story.
Extra credit: Tell the story of how an adult has helped you learn how to do something and how you had a fun moment just like the father and son did in "Searching for Bobby Fischer."

You can read the story starting on page 224 in the new literature book or you can click on the pdfs to read "Rules of the Game" and from "Searching for Bobby Fischer:" Rules of the Game.pdf From Searching for Bobby Fischer.pdf

Assigned Sept. 17, due Sept. 18
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "The Hitchhiker" on pages 88-97 of the new literature book. Answer questions 1, 2, 3, 7, and 9 on page 98. Extra credit: Do either A or B on page 99. This story can be accessed online at: http://genericradio.com/show.php?id=770JOLJ7RY or by clicking on this pdf:
The Hitchhiker.pdf
Questions:
1. What is Ronald Adams's original destination?
2. Why does the repeated sight of the hitchhiker give Adams "the willies"?
3. What does Adams learn about his mother at the end of the play?
7. Who do you think the hitchhiker is? Give proof from the play to support your conclusion.
9. What might happen as Adams continues on his journey? Make sure your guesses are based on details from the play.
Extra credit:
A. The play opens with Adams telling the listeners, "I am not mad." On the basis of what you learn in the rest of the play, do you agree with his assessment? Write a paragraph assessing his sanity.
B. What if the hitchhiker Adams picked up went to the police to report him? Write a one- or two-page scene in which she explains to an officer what happened and what proof she has for thinking Adams might be mad or even dangerous.

Assigned Sept. 19, due Sept. 20
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "The Tell-Tale Heart" on pages 78-83 or here: The Tell-Tale Heart.pdf . Answer questions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 on page 84.
1. Why does the narrator want to kill the old man?
2. Why does the narrator believe he will not be caught after murdering the old man?
3. What actions does the narrator take to prepare for the crime and in covering up the murder?
4. Reread lines 7-13. 82511_74742_0.png
From this passage, what do you think was the relationship between the narrator and the old man?
6. How reliable is the narrator of the story? If he were to talk to you, would you believe what he tells you about yourself? Why?
7. Do you think the police knew the narrator was guilty at any point before he confessed? If so, when do you think the police became suspicious? Give reasons for your answer.
8. Write a Better Answer of at least 100 words to the following question: You know yourself better than anyone.  You have done something terribly wrong. Do you keep it to yourself, or does it eat away at you so much that you break?
Extra credit: No. 8 on page 98: What are some similarities and differences between "The Telltale Heart" and "The Hitchhiker"? Think about the main characters, the settings, and the endings. Present your answers in a Venn diagram like the one shown: 82511_75357_0.png
For the Venn diagram in No. 8, list at least five similarities and five differences for 15 items overall, five in each section of the diagram.

Assigned Sept. 20, due Sept. 25
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "from Something to Declare" on pages 303-309 of the old literature book. Read "My First Free Summer" in the new literature book on pages 112-115. Both stories are written by Julia Alvarez and are about the same topic. After you have read both stories, use an 8 by 10 piece of blank paper and draw a picture or cartoon strip about what happened in the stories. Your drawing should show that you understand what happened in both stories. Somewhere on your drawing you must write down why Julia's family did what it did in the stories. Examples of this assignment using the old literature book are on Mr. Leupold's podium. For more information about the author, here is her official Web site: http://www.juliaalvarez.com/about/

Assigned Sept. 25, due Sept. 26
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "Raymond's Run" on pages 34-42 of the new literature book. On page 43, answer questions 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8. Draw the plot line for No. 6 and list the events requested. You don't have to use complete sentences on No. 6.

The questions to answer are here:
Raymond's Run question list.pdf

Assigned Sept. 27, due Sept. 28
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "The Ransom of Red Chief" on pages 48-57 of the new literature book. On page 59, answer questions 1, 2, 4 (just the last sentence on No. 4), 5, and 6. Extra credit: No. 7 (this can be an iMovie).
You can click on this pdf to read the story:
The Ransom of Red Chief.pdf
Here are the questions: Ransom of Red Chief questions.pdf

Assigned Oct. 4, due Oct. 8
Write four poems at a certain count of syllables per line. The counts will differ for each class as will the topics. You must write the number of the counts for each line in front of each line.
First hour: 7-5-3-2-9-4-8-5, on food, baldness, Halloween, and one free choice
Third hour: 6-7-3-9-2-8-5-4, on love, money, Mr. Leupold, and one free choice
Fourth hour: 5-7-3-5-2-9-1-4, on dinosaurs, animals, fuzzy socks, and one free choice
Fifth hour: 8-3-7-2-5-6-3-6, on doughnuts, sports, cartoons, and one free choice
Sixth hour: 7-4-6-1-5-8-9-3; best friends, cotton candy, baseball, and one free choice

Assigned Oct. 8, due Oct. 10
Writing a pantoum
A pantoum is a form poem with six repeating lines. It follows the pattern below. You can write the poem about any topic. Work to make the repeating lines fit in with the new lines. Write a rough draft today, then fix it and make it better by Wednesday.

1. New line
2. New line
3. New line
4. New line

5. Repeat line 2
6. New line
7. Repeat line 4
8. New line

9. Repeat line 6
10. New line
11. Repeat line 8
12. New line

13. New line
14. Repeat line 3
15. New line
16. Repeat line 1

Assigned Oct. 9, due. Oct. 11
The students have been e-mailed 11 pictures. The assignment is to choose one of the pictures and write a poem about it. The poem can be free verse or traditional (rhyming with verses). The poem's quality is more important than its length. It needs to tell the story about the picture or about what the picture makes the student think of.

Assigned Oct. 10, due. Oct. 12
The students have been e-mailed 11 pictures. The assignment is to choose one of the pictures and write a poem about it. The poem can be free verse or traditional. The poem's quality is more important than its length. It needs to tell the story about the picture or about what the picture makes the student think of.
Poem photos 2.pdf

Assigned Oct. 24, due. Oct. 26
The students have been e-mailed 11 pictures. The assignment is to choose one of the pictures and write a poem about it. The poem can be free verse or traditional. The poem's quality is more important than its length. It needs to tell the story about the picture or about what the picture makes the student think of.
Poem photos 3.pdf

Assigned Oct. 25, due Oct. 29
Write an original poem with a rhyming pattern. The poem must be at least 24 lines, and it must have at least four stanzas. You must mark the rhyming pattern on each line of your poem. Do your best to give the poem rhythm.


Assigned Nov. 1, due Nov. 5
Write a 22-line simile poem following the pattern used in Willow and Ginkgo on page 584 of the new literature book. (It's also on page 214 of the old literature book.) Use the pattern to compare two subjects of your choosing: people, things, animals, emotions ... Willow and Ginkgo.pdf

1. Simile about the first subject you are comparing using "like"
2. Describe the first subject (assonance with line 4)
3. Simile about the second subject using "like"
4. Describe the second subject (assonance with line 2)

5. Simile about the first subject using "like
6. Describe the first subject (rhyme with line 8)
7. Simile about the second subject using "like"
8. Describe the second subject (rhyme with line 6)

9. Simile about the first subject using "as"
10. Simile about the second subject using "as" (rhyme with 12)
11. Simile about the first subject using "like"
12. Simile about the second subject using "as" (rhyme with 10)

13. Simile about the first subject using "like" (rhyme with 14)
14. Describe the first subject (rhyme with 13)
15. Describe the first subject (rhyme with 16)
16. Simile about the first subject using "like" (rhyme with 15)

17. Describe the second subject (rhyme with 18)
18. Simile about the second subject using "like" (rhyme with 17)
19. Describe the second subject (assonance with 20)
20. Describe the second subject (assonance with 19)

21. Opinion about the first subject
22. Opinion about the second subject

Assigned Nov. 6, due Nov. 15-16
Poetry final
You must write an original poem. You can have one partner, or you can work by yourself. You must turn in a typed copy of your poem. This assignment is worth 500 points.
In your poem, you must use the following, and you must mark on your typed copy where you have these literary elements:
1)  At least two similes
2)  At least one metaphor
3)  At least four instances of alliteration
4)  Either one instance of hyperbole or one instance of personification
5)  At least two instances of assonance
6)  A rhyming pattern
You can rap your poem in front of the class to a beat that I provide or to one you provide. If you provide the rap beat, be very sure that it has no bad words.
You can present a computer-created video/Keynote of your poem with music as long as the music is appropriate for school. The poem must be made fully automatic with transitions that don't take up a lot of time in between slides.
If you create a presentation on your computer, you will e-mail it to me or give it to me in another way by Nov. 19. You will present your poetry final to the class on Nov. 15 or 16.

You will label your presentation "Your name(s) poetry final" so that I know whose it is. Make sure we can understand you if you want a good grade. If you are working with a partner, both of you need to share the load. If one of you does most of the work, the other partner should not expect to get a good grade.

You will get an A if you follow the six steps above and have a quality presentation of at least three minutes.
You will get a B if you follow the six steps above and have a presentation of at least two minutes, 15 seconds.
You will get a C if you follow the six steps above and have a presentation of at least 90 seconds.
You will get a D if you follow the six steps above and have a presentation of at least 45 seconds.

If any of the six literary parts are missing from your poem, it could lead to a lower grade depending upon the quality of the rest of your work.

Assigned Nov. 20, part one is due Nov. 26
You are to write a short story with a twist.  Write a loose, 20-event outline listing what will happen in your short story. The twist cannot be that the character wakes up from a dream and all is well again. Each event should be a phrase or a sentence. The outline, due Nov. 26, should be complete from the beginning to the end of the story. This is worth 50 points. The rough draft of the short story is due Dec. 19 and is worth 200 points. The final draft of the story is due Jan. 23 and is worth 500 points. It is to be edited and typed.
Here is a link to a sample loose outline along with an author's description of the ingredients of a story: http://childfinder.us/tag/loose-outline/

Every time the action changes in a story or when there is a stopping point in the action, start a new paragraph.

If you use conversation, each time a different person speaks, you must use a new paragraph. Here are some examples of how conversation should be written:
    "I love the way you smile," she said.
    "Oh, really," he answered, bugging out his eyes and showing all of his teeth. "Like this?"
    "Now you're being silly," she said. "I like your normal smile."

For an exclamation:
     "I'm so excited I could burst!" he yelled.

For a question:
     "Did you really think that was a good idea?" he said with a groan.

For a sentence that is split in the middle by the attribution:
    "If you want to," she said, "go ahead and jump. I wouldn't do it."

For two sentences that are split in the middle by the attribution.
    "I really think this is wrong," he said, checking to see if anyone was listening. "There are too many ways that it could wind up very bad."

Assigned Nov. 28, due Nov. 29
Read "The Medicine Bag" on page 240 of the new literature book and "Who Are You Today, Maria?" on page 248.
Answer the following questions on page 251, restating the question in each answer and writing in complete sentences: No. 1, No. 4, No. 5, No. 6, No. 7, No. 8, and fill in the comparing characters chart at the bottom of the page. Extra credit: No. 3 OR explain in a Better Answers paragraph what the last paragraph on page 247 means.
If you can't log on to ClassZone to read "The Medicine Bag," click on this link: http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/Holt-EOL2/Collection%202/medicine%20bag.htm
Or, click on this: The Medicine Bag.pdf
The Medicine Bag.pages

Click on this for "Who Are You Today, Maria":Who Are You Today, Maria?.pdf
Who Are You Today, Maria?.pages

Here are the questions:

Questions for page 251.pages

Assigned Dec. 12, due Dec. 13
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "The Great Rat Hunt" on pages 120-128 of the new literature book. Answer the questions on page 129: Questions 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, and 10. Extra credit: In at least a page handwritten or half a page typed, singled-spaced, from the rat's point of view, tell the story and what happens next.
The Great Rat Hunt.pdf
The Great Rat Hunt questions.pdf

Assigned Dec. 13, due Dec. 14
Read "Rain, Rain Go Away" on pages 555-561 in the old literature book, or click on this pdf: Rain, Rain Go Away.pdf

and read it.

Use complete sentences and restate each question.
The questions are on page 562: No. 1 plus the comprehension check questions, 2, 4, 5. Extra credit: No. 1, Message Home, on page 563.
If you don't have the book, here are the questions:
1. What was your reaction to how the story ended?
CC1. What is Mrs. Sakkaro always looking at?
CC2. What surprises Lillian and George about what the Sakkaros eat at the fair?
CC3. What happens when the Sakkaros are caught in the rain?
2. Who or what do you think the Sakkaros are? Why do you think Asimov doesn't make their identity clear?
4. How would you describe the attitudes and behavior of the Wrights toward the Sakkaro family? How realistic do you think it is for the Wrights to act this way? Give reasons for your answer.
5. Writers sometimes use the weather to create mood in a story. How do you think the weather affects the mood of this story?
Extra credit: Mr. Sakkaro describes himself as "a student of human nature." Write a message home (wherever that might be!) from the Sakkaros shortly after they move in next to the Wrights. In the message, they should report their impressions of human society.

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Assigned Dec. 14, due Dec. 17
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "The Treasure of Lemon Brown" on pages 170-178 of the new literature book or by reading this pdf: The Treasure of Lemon Brown.pdf

The Treasure of Lemon Brown questions.pdf

Answer the questions on page 179: Questions 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. For No. 5, include at least five instances of Greg's reactions. Extra credit: Do either A or B on page 181. Extra credit: Write at least half a page about a treasure that you value and why you value it.

Assigned Jan. 30, due Jan. 31
Read "The Drummer Boy of Shiloh," pages 318-323 of the new book. In complete sentences and restating each question, answer the following questions on page 324: 1, 2, 3, 6, and do a 100-word Better Answer on No. 7. Extra credit: No. 8 (by yourself), or No. 9. To read the story, click on the pdf file below:
The Drummer Boy of Shiloh.pdf

The Drummer Boy of Shiloh questions.pdf

Assigned Feb. 5, due Feb. 6
Read "Leaving Desire" on pages 405-409 of the new literature book, or click on: Leaving Desire.pdf
1. Acting as if you had lived in the Ninth Ward of New Orleans all your life, would you have left the city before Hurricane Katrina struck, or would you have stayed? If you would have left, would you ever go back? Do at least a 100-word Better Answer.
2. If you were told to leave your pet behind, what would you do? Explain why.
3. If you had just lost your home as many people did in this story and in the San Francisco earthquake, how would you react? What would you do? Could you stay positive?
Extra credit: Research how New Orleans has come back from Hurricane Katrina. In two paragraphs of 100 words each or more, describe how much has been done to restore the city to the way it was before the hurricane. Tell who has done the work and what still needs to be done.

Assigned March 1, due March 4
Read "Hallucinations" on pages 334-353 of the new book. In complete sentences and restating each question, answer the following questions on page 355: 1, 2, 3, 4 (using the following from page 333, make at least two drawings:) 112810_81418_0.png
Also, No. 5, No. 6, and No. 8. Extra credit: No. 7 on page 355, or B from page 357.
If you need to read the story and can't access it through ClassZone, click here: Hallucinations1.pdf
Hallucinations questions.pdf


Assigned Feb. 27, due March 8
Write a five-paragraph persuasive essay about a topic from the list provided or one that is approved of by Mr. Leupold. You must have an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph. The paragraphs must be written according to the form given in class.
Click on this pdf to help you remember what pieces make up an essay: Writing your essay.pdf

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Assigned March 27, due March 28
Read "Checkouts" in the old literature book, pages 23-28, or click on this pdf and read it online:
Checkouts.pdf
   Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
   Answer these questions on Page 29:
   No. 1: Do you think that the girl will eventually come to enjoy life in Cincinnati? Why or why not?
   No. 2: What does the girl think that her parents feel about her? Do you agree or disagree? Explain.
   No. 3: What does the girl's appearance (page 25) tell you about the kind of person she is?
   No. 6: Explain the meaning of the story's title.
   No. 7: Suppose the girl and the boy had actually spoken to each other the first time they met. Would they have liked each other or not? Explain your answer.
   No. 8: Toward the end of the story, the author says that "humans are very complicated" because "they cannot say yes when they mean yes." Do you agree? Why or why not?
   Also, write at least half a page changing the ending of the story, writing it just like a story.

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Assigned April 1, due April 2
   Read "The Dinner Party" on page 566 of the old literature book, or click on this pdf and read it: The Dinner Party.pdf
    The assignment is to write a continuation of the story, either one page, single-spaced, in 12-point type, or two pages handwritten.

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Assigned March 26, due March 27
    Read "The Monkey's Paw," pages 358-370 of the new book. In complete sentences and restating each question, answer the following questions on page 371: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and: Also, considering how the wishes turned out, carefully think out what wishes you would make if you had three wishes. Write down your three wishes with explanations of why these would be good wishes. You cannot wish for more wishes. Extra credit: No. 8 or No. 9. Do No. 9 by yourself, not with a group.
        If you need to read the story, click on the pdf:The Monkey's Paw.pdf     

Assigned April 2, due April 3
Read "The Bet" on pages 286-292 of the old literature book or click here:The Bet (Chekhov).pdf
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Then answer these questions:
1. Which character did you have more sympathy for, the lawyer or the banker? Explain your opinion.
2. Do you think the banker and the lawyer would make the bet if they knew what its effects would be? Why or why not?
3. What do you think of the lawyer's decision not to take the money? Explain your answer.
4. A 100-word or longer Better Answer: If you had a chance to take the bet with all the circumstances of "The Bet" but for five years and you would get $15 million, would you do it? Explain your reasoning.
5. What was the author's reason for writing this story?

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Assigned April 5, due April 8
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "Pandora's Box" on pages 908-911 of the old literature book. You can read a copy of the story here: Pandora's Box.pdf

1. Hera said: "I shall make her a woman, a puzzle to every man." Are women puzzles to men? Explain in a 100-word Better Answer or in a story.
2. What is the message of the story?

Extra credit: Read more about Prometheus. Explain what job Zeus had given him and what happened after that, all the way through Prometheus' punishment and release from that punishment.

Also, if you want to: Read "Aunty Misery" on pages 913-914 of the old literature book. For extra credit, either tell a story that has been passed down in your family for generations, OR Explain what it would be like to live forever, as Aunty Misery does in the story.

The amount of extra credit earned will depend upon the quality and quantity of your work.
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Assigned Feb. 23, due Feb. 24
Read "Stop the Sun" on pages 49-55 of the old literature book. If you haven't read the story, you can find it online by clicking on: http://members.chello.nl/~d.hasselman/stop_the_sun.htm
or click on this pdf file: Stop the Sun.pdf

Answer the following questions in complete sentences, restating the question in your answers.
1. After reading the story, describe what a war is like to the people who fight in one. Are they scared?
2. Was it important for Terry to ask his dad about the war? Why?
3. Put yourself in Terry's shoes when his father is crawling through the store. How do you feel?
4. You are 18. We are at war, and the military draft has been reinstated, so you can be ordered to fight whether you want to or not. What will you do, fight, move to Canada, or what? Explain your feelings in a 100-word Better Answer.
5. What was the author's reason for writing this story?
Extra credit: If you know someone who fought in the Vietnam War, ask them about it. Do they like to talk about it, or do they have the same feelings that Terry's father had? What did they tell you about the war?

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Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "Flowers for Algernon" on pages 190-215 of the new literature book. Answer the questions on page 219: Questions 1, 2, 4, 6, and 9. Also, would you accept such an operation considering your present abilities. Write a Better Answer (at least 100 words) to explain why or why not. Extra credit: Do either A or B on page 221.f
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     Read "Harriet Tubman: Conductor of the Underground Railroad" on pages 260-269. If you need to read it, click on this pdf: Harriet Tubman.pdf
     Answer the questions on page 271, restating and using complete sentences: Questions 1, 2, 3, 5, and a 100-word Better Answer to No. 9. Extra credit: No. 10.

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       Read "Future Tense" on pages 605-613 of the old literature book or click on this pdf: Future Tense.pdf
Use complete sentences and restate each question.h
1. If you were the teacher, what kind of grade would you have given Gary, and why?
2. Compare how Gary thought the assignment should be done and his story to the way Dani Belzer and Mike Chung wrote their stories. How were they different?
3. As the story went on, how did you think it was going to end?
4. When did you first see the twist?
5. Author's purpose?
Extra credit: Continue the story as if you are the author. What happens next? Write at least half a page.

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Read "The Story of an Eyewitness" on pages 398-404 of the new literature book. You can find it at: http://london.sonoma.edu/Writings/Journalism/sfearthquake.html
or click on this: Story of an Eyewitness.pdf
1. In a Better Answer of more than 100 words, answer one of the following questions: A. Jack London says that "Never in all San Francisco's history were her people so kind and courteous as on this night of terror." Why do you suppose people behaved this way? or B. Does this story support the statement "In the face of tragedy, all people are equal"? Why or why not?
2. Describe a situation in the story that is ironic, and explain why it is ironic.
Extra credit: Write a piece of historical fiction about people caught in the fire or watching the fire, OR, write a piece of historical fiction as if you were one of the people whose home did not burn. How would you feel?


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Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "The Woman in the Snow" on pages 956-962 of the old literature book. You also can click on this pdf: The Woman in the Snow.pdf
Then answer the following questions:
1. Does prejudice still exist today? Explain your answer.
2. Defend the decision the first bus driver made.
3. Defend the decision the second bus driver made.
4. What happened at the end?

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Read "The War Party" on pages 738-750 or by downloading the attached pdf:War Party.pdf
Answers must be restated and in complete sentences.
The questions on page 753 are No. 1 plus the comprehension check questions, No. 3, No. 4, and No. 7 as a 100-word Better Answer. Extra credit: Page 754, No. 1 (Westward journal) or No. 2 (Adaptation notes). (The questions are also listed below:)
1. Would you have stayed with Mr. Buchanan or joined the group that followed Bud's family? Why?
CC1. Why do some members of the wagon train want Bud's family to turn back?
CC2. How does Bud's mother save the wagon train from attack?
CC3. What doees Bud's family do at the end of the story?
3. What is your impression of Bud's mother?
4. Bud's mother tells Mr. Ryerson that "it is neither size nor age that makes a man, . . . but something he has inside. My son has it." What do you think she means by "it"?
7. Mr. Burt tells Bud that "Folks hate something they don't understand, or anything seems different." Do you agree with this observation? Explain.
Extra credit: Westward journal-- Choose one of the characters in the story other than Bud. Write several journal entries in which that character describes the events of the wagon train.
OR
What if "War Party" were a science fiction story instead of a Western tale? Make notes on how you would adapt this story to a futuristic setting.

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Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read "The King of Mazy May" on pages 149-156 of the old literature book or read it in this attachment: The King of Mazy May.pdf
In complete sentences and restating, answer the following questions:
1. Considering what he did in the story, what kind of person do you think Walt will grow up to be? Explain your reasoning in a 100-word Better Answer.
2. Suppose this story took place today in a remote part of Canada or Alaska. How would it be similar? How would it be different?
Extra credit: In a 100-word Better Answer, explain why some people in life always decide to be like the claim jumpers.

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Read "The Summer of the Beautiful White Horse" on pages 840-847 of the old literature book or by clicking on this pdf: The Summer of the Beautiful White Horse.pdf
In complete sentences and restating, answer the following questions from page 848:
1. What are your thoughts about the adventures of Aram and Mourad?
1cc. How did Mourad get a horse?
2cc. For what trait was the Garoghlanian family known?
3cc. Why did the boys return the horse?
2. Why do you think John Byro does not take the horse when he recognizes it as his?
3. In your opinion, what kind of person is Mourad?
5. 100-word Better Answer: What if John Byro never had seen the boys with the horse? What if he had angrily accused them of stealing it?
Extra credit: We always make connections to our own lives when we read a story. In a 100-word Better Answer, describe a time when something similar happened to you. In other words, was there a time when you had some fun with a friend or a relative maybe when you shouldn't have been doing it? How did that turn out?

Assigned
Answer in complete sentences and restate each question in your answer.
Read the poems on pages 586, 598, 601, 608 and 628 in the new literature book.
Answer these questions: No. 2 on page 587; No. 3, No. 5, and No. 7 from page 602, No. 2 and No. 8 from page 610, No. 4 from page 630. Extra credit: No. 9 on page 587.
Poems.pdf


Poems questions.pdf


Reading groups test dates
Wednesday, Oct. 20, 150 points
Tuesday, Dec. 14, 250 points
Tuesday, Feb. 22, 350 points
Wednesday, April 20, 450 points
Wednesday, May 18, 500 points
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